Faith

We all believe in something whether it’s a supernatural entity or scientific doctrine. It seems man cannot live without faith. Even atheists believe that there’s no one up above. Still, counts as a faith. In this sense, we can call the former one as positive faith and the latter as a negative one.

And for some, they are fluid and malleable and for some, they are rigid and tight. But how do these faiths form? And do all conscious beings have faith? And what is it to be faithless?

I am convinced that we cannot exist in peace without faith. Because faith gives us comfort. Knowing that an omnipotent god guides the fates and we as mortals just need to fill in the play gives a sense of comfort. Don’t you think?

Our grey matter also nags us when we don’t have faith because lack of faith creates insecurity in our mind and that’s a hard thing to live by. If you cannot trust the police to guard the house then you neither sleep nor live in peace.

In fact, nations break down and laws cannot operate in such a situation. Then we enter a Hobbesian world—“The condition of man . . . is a condition of war of everyone against everyone.”

Moreover, we are hardwired to have faith in someone. When we were infants we had faith in parents that whenever we cry they come up with food, love, care and a plaything. That created the foundation and it’s a powerful experience that shaped all our beliefs which created this collective entity called faith.

However, can prudence and cold logic we develop later in life break it and create a homo-separaticon without faith? And can we trust rationality when we very well know how irrational everyone is?

And when we live with rationality, life wouldn’t be joyous. Without irrationality, there’s no poetry, no music, no drama, no starry night painting.

I guess we need faith in faith. Even if it’s a matrix illusion, at least still we are Homo sapiens.

—Drunken Monk


Wisdom from strangers(Poem)

At a highway motel,
I read a fortune cookie.
It said —
“Imitation is the highest
form of self-deception.”
I defied it,
and stepped into society.
as a result,
I guillotined the self,
in a choreographed civilisation,
and baptised barbarism.
turning vibrant skeleton,
into the lifeless soul.

On a rainy day,
I met a tropical cyclone.
It said —
“You cannot change,
the scripted foreheads,
and,
palmistry cannot undo,
mystic miscarriages.”
of course, I ignored it,
and walked into the traps of,
hopes, vows, wishes, and wills,
crossing fingers in,
the myth of salvation.

In a writers meet,
when my,
gums were bleeding with guilt,
knuckles cracking with knavery,
and yawning tides of sleep,
were trying to make me,
A domicile in dreams,
one young fellow,
gave away his flunkey wisdom —
“Moneyed angles created poverty,
and moneyed demons created the charity.”
I dismissed it,
and still believed in the,
Lord — Adam smith,
the un-read, misunderstood,
god of capitalism.

On a who-gives-a-damn day,
I met a monk,
He said —
after perspiring silence from his empty eyes,
“Open your mind, and,
walk alone,
without,
rules, ideals, ideologies,
and dogmas.”
I think,
He also said —
adjusting his robes,
“walk without sticks,
run without guilt,
and fly without faith.”
well,
my beard murmured,
solitude is a prelude to sanity,
or insanity.
and I went home,
to cater, the conscience.
or whatever it is called these days.


Dan Gardner’s Risk—The Science and Politics of Fear

Fear has grown a lot in our society. There are no snakes around us and no giant dinosaurs that would eat us for supper yet the bombarding and ear-piercing news of climate change, terrorism, crime news, nuclear apocalypse constantly make us bite our nails.

Very handful of books actually look at this problem and the growing fear society we are collectively creating today. This is one of them. We need to read this book because we are in the 21st century and fear shouldn’t be an emotion that chases us in reality and dreams. Instead, we should feel more grateful, thankful and positive. So, let’s dive in ASAP

  • Risk Society. Ulrich beck talks about this risk society with cancers, nuclear disasters, famines, and all horrors we could imagine. Sure, risks are there and have been throughout history. Beck opines that as technology advances we spread more risk and cause eventually a steep fall of civilization. But do we?

    Modern society cures cancer and many nations already abandoned nuclear power programs. In other words, technology is making our lives better and safer. All these stupid fears media pump into our brains rarely happen and even if they happen we know how to tackle them.

    “Put all these numbers together and what do they add up to? In a sentence: We are the healthiest, wealthiest, and longest-lived people in history. And we are increasingly afraid. This is one of the great paradoxes of our time.” —Gardner.
  • Ignore the old software. Dan says that brains haven’t changed a lot. Hence we fear more of lizards than car accidents. We entered the modern age and the brave new worlds, but brain primal fears still are hanging out in neurons. Since Stone Age, our brain has just increased by 200 cubic centimetres. Old fears had a purpose and were useful but now discard them. They are built into our software even though we don’t need them. For instance, monkeys raised in laboratories which never saw a snake backs away.
  • Use system 1 less. Daniel Kahneman in his Thinking fast and slow describes two brain systems. System 1 is largely driven by gut and intuition which passes out judgement without thinking much. System 2 uses the conscious part and is slow and deliberate which makes it less prone to miscalculation. So the logic is to use more of System 2. As Pascal says—“The heart has its reasons for which reason knows nothing of.”
  • Availability heuristic. When you are exposed a lot of times to a particular piece of information then you are influenced by it easily without thinking. More bad weather news makes you consider the possibility of dying in the next hurricane or being killed by an earthquake. But less available news like flu, sugars though very dangerous are less frightening for you.
  • Prefer data over stories. People want stories and anecdotes than hard data. Hence people still believe that mobile phones cause cancer, we have flat earth, angels exist. The author gives an example. In the 1990s rumours without scientific evidence and temper began to spread that breast implants cause cancer and were termed as toxic breasts and ticking bombs. The result was—the company was wiped out in lawsuits and no evidence ever came to light proving its correctness.

    Next time, a panic strikes, you better get your numbers right.
  • Politicians and Pharmaceutical companies have something in common. Yes, both breed fear in their farms. Former to get power and latter to get money. Politicians fake a danger and go to war. Pharmaceutical companies use fear and convince that you need nasty pills and manipulate data about the efficacy of a drug. And politicians are ready to target minorities.

    And now they have a powerful friend—The fourth estate in the name of media.

So always remember this quote that the author puts in the very beginning which I leave at the very end—

“Fear is implanted in us as a preservative from evil; but its duty, like that of the other passions, is not to overbear reason, but to assist it.”

3 Ideas from Brendon Burchard To consider Now

Brendon Burchard is regarded as the world’s leading high-performance coach and an excellent writer who topped the New York Times list of best-selling books 3 times. He is often quoted, googled, watched, and googled on the internet by productive bees who want the best in their life.

His online courses, videos crossed millions and Oprah Winfrey considers him as one of the most influential personal growth gurus of all time. Most people know him through the Brendon show, a wonderful podcast if you want to listen.

There’s a ton to learn from him and here are a few of my favorites—

  • 1)Owning Ambitions 100%

Brendon says that most people never own their ambitions 100%. This is a powerful idea and a truth. We usually own it a 50-60-70%. For instance, you want to write a book, run a blog, make YouTube videos and inspire millions of people online and you invest your resources and time on it but we do it half-heartedly. We don’t accept it but deep down you know it in your bones. I failed many times to do hard things like building a rock-solid body, write a novel. Sure, there are many reasons why I failed but after a lot of reflection, I think Brendon is right.

With just 60% ownership and liking, dreams are hard to come by. So never do this mistake. Chase your dreams only if can own them 100%. Here’s a nugget for you—
“personal power is directly tied to personal responsibility, which most people avoid.”(Brendon Burchard)

  • 2)Guilt is good

Brendon comments that guilt is a sign of learning and the first indication that you have a growth mindset. Trust me if you don’t feel guilty after binge-watching that Tv series all night, there’s something seriously wrong with you. Or you failed to make that blog post deadline possible, you should think and feel about it. That’s how you realize what your next baby steps are.

I always feel bad when I procrastinate on my Wednesday essay day. But guilt makes sure that I write the next day itself. Own guilt and achieve your dreams by course correction.

  • 3)Teach to generate positivity

“You have a clean slate every day you wake up. You have a chance every single morning to make that change and be the person you want to be. You just have to decide to do it. Decide today’s the day. Say it: this is going to be my day.”—Brendon Burchard.

Every morning is a choice to bring positivity to your life. No one can come inside your head and clean it. And positive thoughts won’t come unintentionally. You have to do it deliberately. That’s because the human brain is hardwired to create fear and anxiety. So the machine’s job is to constantly chase you down with 0% probability issues.

This man is worthy to be followed and take note of him. Go ahead. Great ideas can move you, only if you let them.


5 Irresistible tips from Daniel Pink on Marketing, Sales and Persuasion.

Daniel Pink has seen it all. From being a speech writer to Vice President Al Gore to Sales guru and world class author of nearly half a dozen books. His TED talk on motivation is definitely a worthy one to remember for a long time. Apart from this, Daniel has good command over behavioral and social sciences which is just another perfect reason to learn from him about persuasion and the science of good selling.

  • 1)Sales are everyone’s cup of tea.

Nearly everyone is into selling and persuasion, if you think about it. Whether it’s convincing your boss about your idea or if you are a teacher then you are persuading your students to stay on the course or if you’re a blogger like me, then you’re into catchy titles so that people read it.

“People spend nearly 40% of their work time on something akin to persuasion, influencing, convincing.”—Daniel Pink.

So mastering your sales skills really matters. Because you cannot push too much to scare the hell out or too little so that your idea doesn’t matter. And we are into sales everyday not just that guy or woman in a suit to rings the bell.

  • 2)Information Asymmetry is an illusion now.

The new world now is—Information parity. People exactly know what model of car they want with engine power. And they read, watch videos on YouTube about what they want. Consider this, we all google about our disease, see medication and their common side effects and various alternatives to surgery and then go to doctor for treatment. That exactly shows what has changed now.

In other words, you cannot sell a goat when buyer asks for a sheep in this new digital-information age. What people want now from you is your wisdom that is pick out 1 from a 1000 choices that bombard them.

  • 3)Find the common ground through attunement.

You need to be a perspective taker. Think through their lens and walk in their shoes. Empathy is very critical now. This is because when you understand their problem then we can tailor the product and become better persuader.

For instance, McDonalds and KFC unless understand food needs and problems of native cultures cannot sell. And MNC’s giving holidays and day-off on holidays in respect of native cultures is an example of good perspective taking.

And Power bossing over employees and brushing off their problems and issues in office isn’t going to work anymore. And even in business meetings he asks to keep aside an empty chair(considering hypothetical customer there) so that we always have customer driven strategies and ideas. That’s a cheap investment high value investment. Use it ASAP.

  • 4)Persuasion should be personal.

Selling should be personal and empowering. Your product’s mission should be to improve people’s lives. And persuasion shouldn’t be used to scam people. That will hurt your long term prospects.

And one way to improve performance of employees is to make it very personal. Daniel gives an example in Israel where Radiologists have spend more time on patient’s report when a photograph was attached to it than on reports without photograph. This shows that when people know that their work really matters and they are easily persuaded to do quality work.

  • 5)“Loss to you pitch”

Next time you want to sell that balloon blower or hair dryer or even a house. Tell people what they lose not what they gain. This idea is extremely useful and I’ve been using it ever since.

People pay attention when there’s a loss or pain around the corner. Persuade your manager by saying things like—
*If we do this, then sales drop by 60%
*If we hire that guy, then teamwork suffers.
*If we don’t buy this, then our power bill goes up by 12%
*If we don’t upgrade our software, then we lose valuable data like that Tom-Dick-Harry company.

Daniel makes sales a science and persuasion a philosophy. Very concrete and extremely practical. Dig more into his ideas and you won’t regret. His “To sell is human” is a good place to start.

4 Things Bruce Lee wanted you to know.

Bruce Lee, the name that needs no introduction. A world-class martial artist and surprisingly a world-class philosopher too. Time magazine named lee one of the 100 most important people of the 20th century.
We still binge-watch his movies and get dazzled by his cool moves.

But it’s time to dive into his enigmatic, jaw-dropping philosophy that can change our lives.

  • 1)Emptiness, the starting point.

“In order to taste my cup of water you must first empty your cup. My friend, drop all of your preconceived fixed ideas and be neutral. Do you know why this cup is so useful? Because it is empty.”—Bruce lee.

Bruce Lee is famous for this empty cup analogy that he picked up from zen philosophy. This one is a stunner concept to adopt in our life. With a fixed and overflowing mind, all you have are preconceptions, prejudices, and stereotypes. You are never in student mode and this stops learning and growing.

With a full cup, people are not ready to learn but only want to defend their ideas and position. This rigid mindset will limit us and confine us to the cup, like a frog in a well.

  • 2)Flow is the way of life.

“No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man.” —Heraclitus.
Heraclitus also says that change is the only constant thing in our lives.

This was well adapted by Bruce lee in his life. Like water, he asks us to be in a flow, ready to accept the object that gives it the shape and form.

Everything passes away or as Shakespeare puts it in Hamlet—This too shall pass. That sad breakup hangover is not going to last forever and that happy feeling of job promotion also will not last either.

Stay with the change and you shall grow. If you obstruct the water, you become rusty and polluted.

  • 3)Concentration is the root.

“Concentration is the secret of strength.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Bruce Lee sees concentration as the root of all the higher abilities in man. As technology is growing at an alarming pace, our concentration abilities are falling off the cliff.

As the famous study points out we have an attention span less than the goldfish. After just 8 seconds, we are distracted away. That’s why it has become hard to do meditation even for 5 minutes regardless of the app we use or the program we enrol into.

Humans have built civilizations and now are venturing into space to colonize them. But if we cannot compete even with a goldfish, then the problem is too serious to ignore.

Master the combative arts of Lee but first, be attentive.

  • 4)The point is doing.

“The doer alone learns.”—Bruce Lee.

The only thing that matters is action and nothing else. The mere talk will not bring accomplishments and lee says that the surest way to learn something truly, that is, to get master knowledge not chauffeur knowledge, as Charlie Munger says, is to get some real action.

This is also supported by science—the way of kinesthetic learning. Hands-on learning by action helps a lot more than you assume.

Moreover, action can be meditative and acts as a medicine and antidote to our thought paralysis. Action liberates the soul and gives you strength which the thoughts cannot, no matter how noble they are.

welcome the way of the dragon.


BOREDOM—The Superpower everyone ignores.

We all feel bored not just sometimes but usually almost every day. The way out is YouTube scrolling or Instagram feeding. It’s done automatically and subconsciously now.
We can’t sit quietly and do nothing, though this is what philosophers or spiritual gurus say.

We search endlessly on Netflix or Prime to watch some weird Tv show or Productive lazy bugs jump into books or cheap intellectual talks.
The List is endless.

As Albert Camus in The plague remarks—
“The truth is that everyone is bored, and devotes himself to cultivating habits.”

What we don’t understand is boredom is this mysterious force that comes onto you to shake up your life in little ways. But every day we brush it off. The result is we never tap and get on with it.

Well, not anymore. Here’s why

  • 1)Boredom puts your busy brain on a pause.

In this digital and social media age, we are constantly being hit by news, celebrity gossips, ads, and life-advice videos that are simply overwhelming us.

With no time to take a pause, we are losing the right headspace to these bots and algorithms. In the end, we over-fire our neurons and blast our heads with overloaded engagements.

That’s where boredom comes to the rescue. It can put you in sweet solitude protected by dopamine hits. Too much stimulation is hurting your body and mind like never before. Henry David Thoreau could go into the woods but we cannot in our concrete jungles.

If we can use boredom and stay with it instead of binge-watching and binge hitting clicks on phone, it can heal you.

It’s high time we listen to Thoreau advice—


“I find it wholesome to be alone the greater part of the time. To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating. I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude.”

  • 2)Boredom makes you a creative genius.

Sandi Mann, a senior psychology lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire in the UK says boredom is an essential part of the creative process and should be applied to our day-to-day lives.

Boredom allows mind-wandering and that’s when creative juices flow like the mighty Nile river. And when you are bored, there’s no pressure on you to meet your self imposed ideals. You simply don’t care and trust me that create miracles.

Here’s what famous Neil Gaiman says about boredom—

“You have to let yourself get so bored that your mind has nothing better to do than tell itself a story – Neil Gaiman.”

His advice for upcoming writers is to get bored and embrace that crushing boredom to kickstart that never-ending novel that you are planning to write.

  • 3)Boredom means you don’t like something.

Boredom is a reflective-contemplative mirror that’s showing that probably you don’t like something.
If you are bored in the office, then it means the work is not exciting for you.

It means boredom is asking to pursue what you like. It has pulled you out of the matrix. But we engage in what Danckert and Eastwood call—“Maladaptive remedies,” like couch surfing, abusing drugs and alcohol or go out for some adventures like skydiving or trekking mountains.

It’s a wake-up call that you need to hear. Not a distract-yourself call that you need to engage. Hence they advice neither to mask it nor try to outrun it.

As Jon Kabat-Zinn says—when you pay attention to boredom it gets unbelievably interesting.


Jordan Peterson on “How to Find Meaning in your life.”

  • Set aside reasonable amount of time for play.
  • Compare yourself to who you were yesterday.
  • Make friends with people who want only the best from you.
  • Writing is the surest way to improve thinking.
  • Having a good posture changes your mood.
  • Read something written by greats.
  • Make at least one thing better in every single place you go.
  • Sustainable improvement is better than pushing yourself too hard.
  • Ask yourself what you want and move towards that.
  • Break the goal into small parts so that you can achieve something daily and consistently reward yourself.
  • Inaction is costly.
  • Compounding works. Believe in it.
  • Self-consciousness can be a double edged sword. It comes with its own punishments and rewards. Thus, be careful.
  • Self authoring about past, present, future helps and can provide direction.
  • The one skill that holds so much relevance in future will be having attention.



Life Advice from Luke Burgis

  • Understand your desires, they are not yours in the first place.
  • Learn to desire the career and the things you already have in your life.
  • Sometimes winning leaves you unfulfilled because you achieved a desire that wasn’t yours.
  • Maintain critical distance from an issue helps you to think deeply and independently about it.
  • Be with people who have different kind of thinking from you.
  • Taking a pause helps us to avoid emotional reactions.
  • Having a contemplative life is the best.
  • Always detox yourself and get into right headspace.
  • Don’t do something just because you can.